Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran
A/66/374 para 76
Full recommendation:
The Special Rapporteur encourages the Government to open greater space for the
aforementioned groups of civil society actors to be able to carry out their work. He also wishes
to stress the importance of freedom of expression and assembly for a democratic, open society
governed by the rule of law, and encourages the Government to refrain from repressing dissent.
The Special Rapporteur would also like to underscore the importance of perpetuating a culture
of tolerance, and urges the Government to prevent discrimination against women, as well
religious and ethnic minorities, in all spheres of public life and services, and to protect their
freedoms to freely associate and express themselves.
Assessment using Impact Iran human rights indicators1
A. The Special Rapporteur encourages the Government to open greater space for the
aforementioned groups of civil society actors to be able to carry out their work. He
also wishes to stress the importance of freedom of expression and assembly for a
democratic, open society governed by the rule of law, and encourages the
Government to refrain from repressing dissent.
The UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders (HRDs), adopted by consensus by the UN
General Assembly in 1998, recognizes the role of HRDs in the advancement of human rights and
requires specific measures for their protection because they are often exposed to additional and
specific risks. While the Declaration is not a binding document, it articulates existing
international human rights in a context applicable to the work of HRDs. Notably, the Declaration
reiterates the State’s duty to protect the rights to freedom of expression,2 assembly3 and
association4 for all, and specifically calls on States to guarantee these rights as they are crucial
for any type of human rights work.5
Article 27 of the Constitution ostensibly protects the right to freedom of peaceful assembly but
insufficiently complies with international standards set out in the International Covenant on
Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) because it requires that participants are not “in violation of
the fundamental principles of Islam”. There is no clear definition or criteria that define what
1
CCPR.19.1.S.1; CCPR.19.2.S.1; CCPR.21.1.S.1; CCPR.22.1.S.1; CCPR.25.1.S.3
CCPR.21.1.P.2; CCPR.25.1.P.1
CCPR.21.1.O.2; CCPR.21.1.O.3; CCPR.22.1.O.2; CCPR.25.1.O.1; CCPR.25.1.O.2
2
Article 19, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
3
Article 21, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
4
Article 22, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
5
OHCHR, https://www.ohchr.org/en/issues/srhrdefenders/pages/declaration.aspx

1

Select target paragraph3